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Portfolio of Oasis International Kindergarten.

Oasis International Kindergarten was established more than a decade ago. It is a privately owned International school catering for children aged 3 – 6yrs.The school is able to facilitate up to two hundred students, who will be of mixed Nationality. We operate under the Ministry of Education.

Oasis follows the British EYF curriculum with some Montessori input.

Each classroom with more than ten children has two members of staff in each, a teacher and a teaching assistant, usually one being an Omani National and the other being a native English speaker. The subjects covered are Math, English, Arabic, P.E, Drama, Cookery classes, music & movement and a curriculum topic.

The purpose of the school is to prepare the pupils for school which includes teaching them social skills and development.

Senior management consists of the school Director, the Principal and head of KG. They are jointly responsible for the day to day running of the school which includes short and long term planning, implementing H & S, regular assessment of both pupils and staff , H.R, Keeping and reviewing all guidelines set by the Ministry of Education/social affairs.

How the company sets goals, the process and planning.

How the company sets goals, the process and planning.

Goals are set at the beginning of each academic year. These are initially based on the parent’s expectations. Parents are invited to give suggestions on how they feel the school can improve Furthermore, advice and suggestions are regularly given by the Ministry of Education. It is important to note that, Kindergarten children have no set curriculum to follow, this is set using the schools discretion. The process involves, firstly dealing with any pressing concerns, such as implementing new subjects that they feel their child is failing at. For example, is their child reaching targets? This is important, as most primary schools in Oman have an entrance exam, before a child is accepted, thus certain standards and levels of knowledge must be met.

Intermediate planning.

Intermediate planning.

Staff meetings are held regularly and the teachers convey any observation or concerns which the parents have reported. In addition, the parents are regularly invited to fill out questionnaires’ expressing their opinions. This input is vital, not only from an academic point of view and for the child’s welfare, but on a business level, the school must be competitive in order to maintain popularity and generate a successful income.

Short term planning.

Short term planning.

At all times it is the responsibility of the Principal to maintain a high level of quality and this involves “thinking on her feet”. For example, if a special event is scheduled, which is out of the ordinary norm, she must make arrangements and plan celebrations. An example is, when HRH Queen Elizabeth of England visited Oman, the school was decorated with welcoming banners and the British children were invited to bring in traditional English food. Other such events often crop up with only a few days to prepare for, with the help of teaching staff and parents, such events are usually successfully organised at short notice. An example of this, was when H.M Sultan Qaboos returned to Oman, following medical treatment abroad, a welcome home celebration was held.

Long term planning.

Long term planning.

Long term planning happens at the end of an academic year in preparation for the following year. New subjects are usually added in keeping with new technology, for example computers are now use in the home by many young children. Therefore this year older students will be taught about on-line safety, and the importance of restrictions. This requires research from staff and also gives time for appropriate staff to be employed, training of staff and materials to be sourced. Events which happen on a regular basis, such as Ramadan, Eid and National day are celebrated. Crafts and decorations are made to celebrate Ramadan and Eid. During Ramadan various charity events are held, which involve contacting organisations, such as Dar Al Atta and inviting children from the orphanage to visit. Money raised by the children from Oasis enables them to buy a gift for the less fortunate. Food parcels are also donated by the children and these are distributed to the less fortunate. Timetables and topics are subject to change each year. For example school timings were extended in September 2017 and an” After school club” was opened to accommodate working parents.

Organising.

Organising.

Different departments are responsible for assigned tasks. Decisions are taken jointly by the school directors and principal. A budget is given to purchase any additional school programmes and equipment. Each member of staff has individual set tasks, such as the Arabic teacher, she will be responsible in familiarising herself with the Ministry approved Arabic programme which should be age appropriate. Below are a few examples of the structure of the organisation.

Teachers.

Teachers.

All teachers are predominantly responsible for the safe, smooth and effective day to day running of the classroom, in addition they are responsible for printing worksheets, conveying to upper management requirements of stationary, classroom equipment needs and most importantly the assessing of children and their development, reporting to the principal any cause for concerns, in turn the principal will convey this to the parents and offer additional help.

Finances.

Finances.

The director of school finances is responsible for the annual budget, salaries, collection of school fees are making payment for utilities etc.

Principal

Principal

The person who “fronts” the general public is the principal. She is the person who deals with parents, pupils, staff and external organisations. It is her responsibility to manage the school in a professional, safe and effective manner. Sending a child to school for the first time is a daunting experience for any parent. They will have many concerns and questions, after all they are entrusting their most precious possession in to care of strangers. Initially the parents will meet the principal, who will tell them about the staff, procedures, curriculum, rules and school policies. They will discuss individual needs and any areas of concern (such as medical conditions). This is one of many tasks. In addition the Principal must liaise with all organisations regarding laws, H & S, Ministry of manpower etc. The school can only run efficiently, if the various internal departments work together.

Leading.

Leading.

Input from the teachers is crucial. It is they who have direct everyday contact with the children, who in turn form an attachment to them. These are the foundations that form trust and confidence .This will become apparent and will show in all areas of the child’s development. The teacher’s success (or failings) will influence and motivate how upper management run the school and update policies and procedures. For example, if the teacher feels that the curriculum is too difficult and not age appropriate, this will show in how the child succeeds, if this is the case the teacher informs the principal and requests more time to complete an assignment or to make changes to the existing curriculum. Teachers have a very difficult yet rewarding job. This is recognised by the school, who have a “teacher of the year” reward system in place and this is also reflected in their salary increases and time and money invested in sending teachers for ongoing training. Likewise, the children receive regular certificates presented to them to recognise their good behaviour and efforts.

Controlling.

Controlling.

The company has procedures in place which must be followed in order to be handled correctly. There are certain steps to be taken. Below is an example:- Scenario, a disruptive child who is proving difficult to control. This is a very common occurrence and no doubt will continue to be so. All children are given time to settle into a new surrounding and routine and allowances are made for bad behaviour. Disruptive behaviour is usually in the first few weeks. If it continues beyond this the teacher will try different methods of prevention. This may include moving the child to a different seat, sending them to the principal’s office for “time out”, lastly a letter home to the parents expressing concern and asking for their intervention. If their behaviour improves, they will be rewarded and constantly praised. If there is no improvement the teacher will request a meeting with the parents before taking further steps. In some instances the child may be moved to another class if it is felt they are influenced by their existing peers, reports and records will be kept and shared with the parents. This is a learning curve for the teachers, as they have to deal with many different and unique situations. They often share concerns with other teaching staff and management in order to find a solution and prevent further disruption. Quality control is of upmost importance. One disruptive child can cause an entire class to suffer. The teacher’s time and efforts spent on that one child will result in holding back the remaining children.

Conclusion.

Conclusion.

The entire success of any organisation is based on a good network of staff, who work together to obtain maximum effect. Good and consistent communication is paramount. Information shared from the onset will minimise problems and prevent them from manifesting into much bigger problems later on. Policies and procedures are put into place to safeguard the children staff, school property and of course the reputation and success of the school. Steps should be taken to report back to senior staff, who in-turn will offer solutions advise and in some cases, help from outside higher organisations. Happy and content individuals banded together results in an excellent team, this is the key to the smooth and successful running of any company